The importance of Omega-9 for the reduction of Retinol hypersensitivity

 

Retinol (Vitamin A) is highly recognized as a very effective vitamin for anti-aging treatment due to its capacity to stimulate collagen production, accelerate cell-reproduction and normalize skin keratinization. Its regular application significantly improves skin elasticity, smoothness, and softness, resulting in younger, clearer, and healthier-looking skin.

 

Although retinoids show promise in the treatment of skin aging, irritant reactions such as burning, scaling or dermatitis associated with retinoid therapy limit their acceptance by customers.

 

 

 

These burning, inflammation, and itch reactions resulted from the TRPV1 activation, which is an ion channel found in sensory neurons, that mediates the detection of noxious environmental stimuli in primary pathophysiological conditions. The activation of TRPV1 leads to a painful, burning sensation. Since these reactions are the main adverse effects of topical application of retinoids it is important to identify naturally antagonists of the TRPV1 channel and combine them in retinol formulations offering better customer compliance.

 

Omega-9 fatty acids are naturally occurring antagonists of the TRPV1 channel. By inhibiting TRPV1 in peripheral neurons, they partially block pain evoked by its agonists and itch evoked by histamine. Omega-9 series fatty acids (enriched in oleic acid and erucic acid) commonly come from plant oils and animal fat. Found naturally in the skin, oleic acid is known to have healing, regenerating, immunity, supporting, anti-microbial, and powerful absorption properties. An essential fatty acid, linoleic acid is known to play an important role in hydration, restoring the barrier function, skin brightening, and healing properties.

 

 

Collectively, these findings suggest that the combination of Retinol with Omega-9 enriched oils helps to reduce burning, and inflammation by lowering the TRPV1 activity underlying pain.  Resulting in a solution to treat retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity.

 

 

Bibliography:
Caires, R., Luis, E., Taberner, F., Fernandez-Ballester, G., Ferrer-Montiel, A., Balazs, E., Gomis, A., Belmonte, C. and de la Peña, E., 2015. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain. Nature Communications, 6(1).
Jenning, V., Gysler, A., Schäfer-Korting, M. and Gohla, S., 2000. Vitamin A loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for topical use: occlusive properties and drug targeting to the upper skin. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 49(3), pp.211-218.
Yin, S., Luo, J., Qian, A., Du, J., Yang, Q., Zhou, S., Yu, W., Du, G., Clark, R., Walters, E., Carlton, S., and Hu, H., 2013. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 123(9), pp.3941-3951.
Puntambekar, P., 2004. Direct Interaction of Adenosine with the TRPV1 Channel Protein. Journal of Neuroscience, 24(14), pp.3663-3671.
Medeiros-de-Moraes, I., Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, C., Kurz, A., Oliveira, F., Abreu, V., Torres, R., Carvalho, V., Estato, V., Bozza, P., Sperandio, M., Castro-Faria-Neto, H. and Silva, A., 2018. Omega-9 Oleic Acid, the Main Compound of Olive Oil, Mitigates Inflammation during Experimental Sepsis. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2018, pp.1-13.

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